Mathematics Competitions 2020

2020 Mathematics Competitions

During the year, 203 students from all years took part in the United Kingdom Mathematics Trust individual challenges, along with students from other schools in the UK. These competitions consist of a series of challenging multiple choice maths problems, where the use of a calculator is not allowed.

In February Year 9 and 10 students competed, achieving 41 certificates (27 Bronze, 12 Silver and 2 Gold). Two students were invited to take part in the follow-on round. The Years 7 and 8 challenge was due to take place in April, but lockdown meant that this couldn’t happen in the usual way. The 97 Year 7 and 8 students who took up the challenge entered on-line at home. They achieved 47 certificates (33 Bronze, 10 Silver and 4 Gold). More recently, 19 students from Years 12 and 13 and one student from Year 11 took part in the hardest challenge. They achieved 13 certificates (6 Bronze, 4 Silver and 3 Gold). Three students were invited to take part in the follow-on round with one student narrowly missing the first qualifying round for the UK Maths Olympiad team.


Gold certificate winners

Year 7

Ruth Bell

Sophia Patsavellas

Methiyan Rajalingam – Best in School

Year 8

Ollie Tolchard – Best in Year

Year 10

Kelvin Yu – Best in School and follow-on round

Sau Hua Yip – Follow-on round

Year 11

Kelvin Yu – Best in School and follow-on round

Year 12

Tommy Jenkins – Best in Year and follow-on round

Year 13

Daniel Rowland – Best in Year and follow-on round


Try for yourselves:

Year 7 and 8 question

The digits of both the two-digit numbers in the first calculation below have been reversed to give the two-digit numbers in the second calculation.

The answers to the two calculations are the same.

62 ×13 = 806     26 × 31 = 806

For which one of the calculations below is the same thing true?

25 × 36     34 × 42     54 × 56     42 × 48     32 × 43


Year 9 and 10 question

The Knave of Hearts stole some tarts. He ate half of them, and half a tart more. The Knave of Diamonds ate half of what was left, and half a tart more. Then the Knave of Clubs ate half of what remained, and half a tart more. This left just one tart for the Knave of Spades. How many tarts did the Knave of Hearts steal?

63     31     19     17     15


Year 11, 12 and 13 question

Two circles C1 and C2 have their centres at the point (3,4) and touch a third circle, C3. The centre of C3 is at the point (0,0) and its radius is 2. What is the sum of the radii of the two circles C1 and C2? 

6     7     8     9     10

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